The holodeck: Modular Robotics

In the coming weeks I will examine a few technologies that could function like a holodeck. Today I’ll examine the modular robotics.

This is my favourite holodeck replacement because it resembles the original holodeck in Star Trek most closely. Imagine a large room, about 2 stories high. You enter on the first floor, the floor you now stand on is silvery grey, these are robots. Half the room is filled with millions of robots, even smaller then a grain of sand.

The holodeck of Star trek, uses many exotic technologies like forcefields, transporters and replicators to create a realistic fantasy world within a confined space. Though this is great it is also uncertain at best if all the required technologies will ever become a reality. It is way easier to use robotics to do pretty much the same thing, with a little help from holographic projectors maybe.

Modular robotics are like high tech LEGO bricks. Each module is a small computer that has sensors and can connect with other modules. when they interact they essentially become a supercomputer which is able to rearrange itself into complex structures. the modules themselves are responsible for forming into the right objects with the right characteristics (soft or hard, warm or cold, colour, large or small, square or round etc.) while a central computer is responsible for the overall scene that needs to be created (e.g. a house with a bench in front on which a woman sits who is scolding you for being late).

If you walk across a street the scene changes accordingly. What will happen is that on one side of the room object are rapidly constructed and on the other side they are broken down just as fast. The robots get from one side to the other in a way that is not unlike the ocean currents. on ground level the robots move in on direction and underground a torrent of robots moves in the opposite direction effectively keeping you in the middle of the room. far off objects are projected on the walls and/or created with holographic projectors.

Of course the first generations of these blocks aren’t all that great. The modular blocks are not intelligent and need to be assembled by hand to do anything but they will eventually become more powerful and will eventually gain more and more of the functions I described above. When they get a resolution of a centimetre square (about half an inch square) it could get some applications. For instance in the military, allowing for urban warfare training in a large area or an architect showing a house not even build yet. When they get down to one millimetre square (about 1/25 inch square) it will be good enough to have wide scale applications. From designing a production line and training workers to work with that production line to entertainment purposes. When it gets down to the size of sand I think you will have a nearly real virtual reality.

Upkeep is easy, just add a bucket of new modules to replace faulty ones every so often. The faulty ones are detected by the modules around it and kept apart until they can be discarded by the user. Further along the line the faulty ones will be filtered out and repaired or recycled in a special part of the ‘holodeck.’ Which will eliminate upkeep altogether. On the downside: so many robots and computers will require a lot of power. In order to meet the power demand we will need new sustainable sources of power like solar, wind, geothermal or fusion power. Another downside is that it requires a relatively large space.

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